Out of This World Literacy : 3 Books and Lessons to Teach Tension
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3 Books and Lessons to Teach Tension

Hi There!


Looking for ideas on how to teach students how to identify and analyze tension in stories?  Check out the three mini lesson statements and watch the video to get more ideas on how to teach tension with three specific books.  








Here is a chart with three mini lesson statements and examples of how to frame your whole class discussion.  Fill out your charts with these organizers as you discuss each book with the class!








The Man Who Walked Between the Towers is such a great book to teach tension.  It also is a true story about a man that snuck into the World Trade Center Towers as they were being constructed, slung a tight rope across the towers, and walked in the sky!!


Going along with the World Trade Center theme, Fireboat: The Heroic Adventures of the John J. Harvey is an incredible true story about how an old fireboat helped during the terrorist attacks on 9/11.  It's a great book for teaching tension!



Lon Po Po: A Red-Riding Hood Story from China is an awesome twist on the Little Red Riding Hood story, and a great book to teach tension!





3 Books and Lessons for Teaching Tension
3 Books and Lessons for Teaching Tension https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Reading-Comprehension-460278
Posted by Out of This World Literacy on Tuesday, July 19, 2016



For a variety of questions about tension in three formats that reinforce your teaching and can be used with any mentor text at any level, check out this resource!







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1 comment:

  1. I watched your video tonight and loved it! All of the books seem very engaging! I'm unfamiliar with the term "tension" when referring to a comprehension strategy. I teach third grade. Is this a term used in older grades or is this a new term?

    Thanks!
    Carly

    ReplyDelete